Who makes the best hot dogs?

I don’t care for boiled or steamed dogs. I really like them charcoal grilled, but a gas grill or a flat top is also a good way to have them cooked.

Does your friend have a last name?

3 Likes

I just do them on the George Foreman.

Neighbors have the kids poke spaghetti into them and then boil them and the spaghetti cooks along with the hot dog, which then has the cooked spaghetti sticking out of it. Kids think it’s brilliant. They call them “aliens”. No need for buns that way as the spaghetti is the starch.

I like spaghetti and I like hot dogs but I’m not sure I’d like them together like that. But maybe sometime if I’m out of hot dog buns I’ll try it. In the meantime, George Foreman.

Yeah, Vienna Beef is the standard.

But if I’m eating a hot dog at home, I’m not taking the time to gather everything, chop onions, etc. And if you don’t put all the stuff on it and the taste of the hot dog stands out more, I think Hebrew National and Nathans are better-tasting hot dogs.

Also, the Chicago standard is to use a hot dog bun with poppy seeds on it.

Normally I don’t, She’s Stadium had an amazing steamed dog

Tony Packo’s is different and good and I stop there when I’m passing Toledo.

Thanks Klinger

2 Likes

Sort of like doing it on the flat top in that you can get a sear on them. Haven’t had them that way but I’d probably like it.

Beware of ordering a “hot dog” from a (real) Vietnamese place . . .

But for the OP’s question, I’m much more preferential to a Polish sausage.

1 Like

My city has a hot dog subculture that has a fair number of local specialists. I didn’t get into it so no real dog in that fight :rimshot:
Agree with @ArthurItas that charcoal dogs are very good. A good charcoalimg can cover an inferior dog.
Since I have been doing the HS concession stand, I have tried to improve the dog we sell.
For football we serve a 1/4 beef dog. Nathan’s before covid disrupted supply. Used to have a pro partner who griddled them on the fly, but that arrangement ended. I don’t have the workers or space (new fridges eat up my space) to do that, so I cook in cafeteria oven and carry down to hot hold in stand. I try to assemble and wrap shortly before sale so bun will hold up. Too long in hold for an assembled dog and the moisture from the dog mushes up the bun. I am still looking for a better bun. Ketchup/mustard/relish packets due to time constraints.
For volleyball/basketball the stand is different and volume is lower so I can assemble on demand. I have a roller that can go from fridge to 170 internal in about 20 minutes on the 2 oz Nathan’s all beef. A little longer on mid heat to get a nice browning. 10 secs in the microwave for the bun, assemble. Ketchup, mustard, dill relish, plus jalapenos and/or nacho cheese from the nachos we sell is what I have to top. Sorry no onions or kraut unless you bring it.

Maybe try and toast the bun?

This is the problem with a lot of ballpark dogs. Steamed dogs that are wrapped then put in a steam table to keep warm are mushy and no good IMO. I’ll stroll the ballpark until I see a stand where the dogs are getting freshly griddled instead.

What’s even worse are corndogs being wrapped and held. Those are downright gross. The only way to get those are hot and right out of the fryer.

I’m not a fan of toasted hotdog buns. Hamburgers sure, but not hotdogs. The bun needs to conform to the shape and toasting hinders that.

1 Like

Jingleheimerschmidt.

2 Likes

I prefer corn dogs to hot dogs although the lack of pickles with corn dogs is a drawback.

Corn dogs with pickled jalapenos in the batter FTW

Corn dogs seen to a way of hiding the worst quality hot dogs ever made under a thick breading that falls off when yo bite into it.

Unless it started out frozen, the breading doesn’t usually fall off, in my experience. And if they can pass off low quality dogs that way, win/win!

1 Like

If we are going off script a bit, pigs in blankets are the best hot dog delivery vehicle. Come at me.

1 Like