Virtual interview attire

Yo, just wondering what you peeps been wearin’ during them zoomies. I watched my wife do some but she works in tech so everyone just wears t-shirts with dank memes as their background image.

Dunno if stodgy insurance companies work the same way. So what do.

Most candidates I’ve been interviewing have just been wearing nice shirts. Rarely ties or jackets.

I wear tshirts. But I’m also not cheer captain, I’m just on the bleachers.

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Like old candidates (me), or younger ones?

I’ve seen mostly businesses casual attire (from the waist up)

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I’ve interviewed students, so maybe not representative, but I’ve seen everything from suit and tie, to dishevelled t shirts. Protip, not the dishevelled t shirt. I figure appearance doesn’t matter unless you’re making a statement, and a wrinkled t shirt that looks like it came from the dirty laundry pile makes a statement. Anything else, eh, whatever.

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Button up collared shirt as a guy. Id throw a suit jacket on myself, but probably depends on the level you are interviewing for if you feel like you need one of those or not. Tie not necessary.

Personally I’d wear a collared shirt and jacket, but no tie.

Agree with SL though that when I’ve interviewed I haven’t really cared what people wore unless it was so casual as to stand out, in which case it’s not good. If you look decked out on video then I just figure you’re nervous.

lol RN

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TIL: That CS has a wife. Or is making such a claim.

As for the OP: I’ve had phone interviews . . . doesn’t matter what I wore, obviously.

Never had to do a video interview. One technique my company has started doing (especially at the start of the pandemic) is for interns and seasonal help to record their “interview” with a set of standard questions to answer. The individual can record answer for one question and decide to go with it or to re-record it. And they can go question by question if they want (IIRC).

But if I had to do a virtual interview, I would certainly work to not look like a slob. I would also take into consideration what else I’m doing that day. I’m not going to change outfits just for an interview.

Minimum attire: collared shirt (pollo or button up shirt) and slacks (never know if you need to “stand up”.

Definitely do it without pants on as it will help you exude confidence

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I hate those pre-recorded interviews. I get nothing out of watching them and refuse to do them myself.
They’ve been requested twice so far. One time, the HR person had to get back to me while she figured out what to do and i took another position before she got back to me. The other time, the HR person immediately scheduled a Zoom call.
I’m not anywhere near entry level though so I can do those types of things.

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button up, sweat pants or underwear.

My company has been doing the recorded interviews for years. I’ve done several myself and reviewed dozens. I always wear a tie. But I like an excuse to wear a tie. The idea in any interview is to make yourself stand out from the crowd. Most people won’t be dressy so a tie helps make you memorable. It also makes me feel more confident which helps me nail the questions.

I generally don’t care what a candidate wears. Being dressy makes me feel like they might actually care about getting the position as an initial impression. But really, the enthusiasm for the position comes through in their responses. I do judge people if they look sloppy as the positions I’ve hired require a certain attention to detail. If you can’t take the time to change your coffee stained polo shirt when you are obviously at home I’m skeptical that you are going to write well thought out code.

you should go with the “attire mullet” - business on the top, party on the bottom.

honestly, the people who still live in their mom’s basement are probably the people who write the best code

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Probably belongs in the misread things thread, but I was here.

Virtual — interview attire
vs
Virtual interview — attire

The first may be more appropriate for GoA :grinning:.

For a male interviewing for an entry-to-mid-level or senior individual contributor type role at a carrier, I’d say a button-down shirt with a collar, or possibly a nice polo. Coat and tie not necessary.

For a consulting gig or a mid-to-upper-level management position, I’d recommend button-down shirt and jacket.

In both cases, I’d also put a little bit of thought into the background and environment coming through on the camera.

Within reason, I’m not too fussed about what a candidate wears. My big thing is authenticity. If it really is your thing to wear a coat and tie in the office or on Teams meetings, then by all means do that. But if you’re awkward and uncomfortable with a tie (like I am)…then don’t do that.

I’m not putting on a tie for anything unless I feel it’s mandatory. I don’t mind wearing a sport coat at all.

I’m surprised at the number of “no-tie” comments here. Personally I’d say formal. It does feel a bit weird wearing tie/suit in the house, but definitely not so on the other end of the camera.

Once you have the job though you can do T-shirt with dank memes

generational thing.

With the number of millennials becoming mangers/directors/CEOs, wearing a suit or a tie will seem very very apparent, in a very negative way.

  1. seems very try hard
  2. seems very socially awkward, a big no no. Read the room, as they say. No one wears a tie or suit in this day and age anymore.
  3. if it doesn’t fit or done well, is very ugly
  4. the interviewer might think you’re a freak that you’re wearing a tie in your own house.