United States Presidential & Congressional Election 2024

There seems to be consensus on protecting impoverished children, although it’s hard to notice.

This article details how child poverty has been steadily decreasing since 1993.

It really surprised me. I think some of it may be that it has not paid political dividends to advertise bipartisanship since 1993, so it isn’t sold to the public that way.

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the delivery systems are onerous for those with very little.

it takes a long time to get places when poor and carless or single-car when parent has it at work. even well placed public transport has long delays. there is a huge lack of livable housing. you say they have access to it, but there are long wait lists for section 8 vouchers where I live. lacking housing, that voucher is a hard thing to wait for. then not every landlord takes the vouchers. lacking real kitchens makes a lot of food banks and other food items useless owing to no where to store and prepare better food.

we should improve delivery of benefits for sure bc then we could actually measure the impact and adequacy of what is there. if we aren’t willing to improve the delivery, then the problem persists and then the only available solution is more benefits until those who need it are immersed in it.

your “most liberals” will settle for improved delivery and true measure of impact. unsaid is that “most conservatives” are yelling to cut the programs bc they aren’t working as desired and are content to let more live in the street without the housing, food, and clothing they need to enjoy the greatest place on earth.

work on delivery of the benefits. and more housing period.

in my school district we have many “technically” homeless/highly mobile students. no they didn’t run away nor are they neglected. the parents are homeless bc they couldn’t afford rent and got evicted. so they are sleeping in cars, couch surfing, split up and staying elsewhere (that is not steady or long term reliable) until a new solution is found. we had a 700 unit rundown apartment complex in town that was what is referred to as “naturally occurring affordable housing” (“NOAH”). it got sold and improved and rents went up and then all (100% of units) new tenants. which was great for removing a tired property from the landscape, but the ~3500 people (yes, do the math on people/1BR unit) displaced were cast into the wind like leaves in the fall. there are not 700 more readily available affordable units and so that’s a challenge. you wishing them to “be less poor and more awesome at finding accessible cheap housing” isn’t grounded in reality.

you lead many things with “my understanding of is…” and you have no knowledge or contact with people living with that . I only have contact, not experience fortunately for me. but while the debate rages real people are suffering, extending the reach and impact of poverty on more and more.

i say this about a lot of things (not here, but IRL) - we as a society aren’t serious about solving or working on some things. we just aren’t. I will agree that we likely have too many programs. we should have fewer (maybe) and they should work really well but that has cost. If you needed a whole tank of gas to actually get somewhere and i gave you half a tank, i gave you a lot. But you won’t get there. So next time someone is starting in that place i begrudgingly gave them 55% of a tank, i gave them a lot more but it still won’t get them there. we seem to have IMO too many half measures where things aren’t executed well enough and efficiently enough. social services and supporting people is expensive.

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I don’t think helping the poor is every really a top political priority. We throw money at the problem which is enough to tick a box and move on for most democrats and it can be done quietly enough that it won’t ruffle the feathers of the conservatives.

For the most part the poor represent reliable votes for democrats and Republicans depending on where they live. They also tend to live the furthest away from the suburbs where elections are won or lost.

Helping the poor is certainly a liberal cause that i agere with, but i think these results should not be surprising given our political system.

We need to be getting more real life improvements into these communities that generate real opportunities for people to change their situations. Jobs are the real long term game changer. This is what Trump promised that earned him a dedicated base of support. I think Biden has actually delivered more results on this, but admittedly i think a big part of it was also the pandemic that disrupted the workforce to force through rapid changes.

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I would need to see how this is defined to know why. It’s probably mostly in the numbers chosen or some demographic trend in the US (like poor people are much more likely to have children in the US than rich people) is one explanation.

Why should it matter if they’re poor when you believe the government already gives poor children everything they could possibly need?

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This you?

Well maybe it gets into what counts as income? For instance my health insurance comes out of my pocket and is counted as income. Whereas a poor family receives Medicaid Benefits which do not. My food comes out of my income whereas a poor family receives WIC which does not count as income. Free lunch at school does not count as income, tax credits do not count as income, etc etc etc. so when we talk about poverty all we are looking at is income and the poor receive a lot of stuff from the government that doesn’t count as income. I guess how poor are they really would be a relevant question.

You get more government subsidy just from the home mortgage deduction than the poor get. No doubt.

You expect free parking. It ain’t without cos, you just get it for free. Wonder who pays?

It’s a long list, mate.

I am in the Po. I have a $250,000 mortgage at 2.3% interest. That’s $5750 I get to deduct I would pay about 30%ish in taxes on that so $1750. Lot’s of doubt.

Medicaid alone costs about $9000 per benificiary.

EXHIBIT 22. Medicaid Benefit Spending Per Full-Year Equivalent (FYE) Enrollee by State and Eligibility Group : MACPAC.

Regarding “cheap housing”, note that these programs are not “entitlements”. They need to have specific appropriations every year. If we measure “need” by families that meet the income limits, there are only enough dollars to help one-fourth of the needy families. (I’m pretty confident that the administrators try to get the ‘neediest’ cases to the top of the lists, so it’s probably not as bad as 1/4 sounds.)

How about funding the programs so every family that meets the income test actually gets rent subsidies?

But, I agree that’s not enough. The gov’t can provide for the immediate material needs. It is much harder to “break the cycle of poverty”.

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Some 2024 Presidential campaign questions from a curious foreigner.

The US economy is booming right now despite what the Republicans and Fox News say. Even inflation is dropping rapidly. What economic problems can the Republicans criticize Biden on? The size of the deficit and the debt? People have jobs and that is what most voters will focus on?

Will the Republicans thus campaign primarily on wokeness and Hunter Biden?

Assuming Joe Biden gets the nomination, his choice of running mate may be even more of a factor this time than last time because of his age. Is Harris a liability for him as she doesn’t seem very popular? Should he choose someone else as his running mate? I appreciate it would be a major insult not to choose your VP as your running mate but….

I have that cassette tape somewhere in box in my basement.

I expect that a fundamental element of GOP/Fox messaging will be that the economy actually is in horrible shape. We’re less well-off than we were in 2019, before the global COVID conspiracy ruined things, and stuff costs a lot more.

Also, they’ll be able to campaign on the upcoming expiration of TCJA, a.k.a. “Trump’s” tax cuts, as well as how the “evils” of ESG are creating a drag on the markets and increasing financing challenges for vital red-state industries.

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repeating the same complaints, highlighting all pieces of the economy that aren’t going great, and imploring everyone to believe the data showing anything going well is built on manipulation, lies, and half-truths.

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It’s kinda cute that you think facts matter…

I’m not sure about “primarily”, but they will be major talking points

I’ve never understood why Harris is a liability.

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What??
Check out all the things she’s done as a VP, like, um…
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SHE’S A WOMAN!! OF COLOR!!! CAN YOU NOT SEE THAT???

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And she was a cop or something.

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She’s not popular, especially with moderates. I barely remember the 2020 primary debates, but I do recall that in ranking the Dem primary candidates I consistently ranked Amy Klobuchar at the top, Joe Biden near the top, and Kamala Harris at or near the bottom.

There’s probably a thread… I guess on AO (thanks DW Simpson) where I went into more detail about why.

Don’t get me wrong, I’ll vote for Biden/Harris over Trump/X or DeSantis/X any day. I’d vote for Harris/X over Trump/X or DeSantis/X.

But if it was Harris/X vs Haley/X then the choice is not so clear. I’d be holding my nose either way, but… which way?

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Minority woman?

Beyond that Republicans spin her record as assistant DA and DA as soft on crime, while Liberals tend to see her as being too tough on crime during her tenure, at least too tough on the wrong kinds of crime.

She’s not an overly charismatic speaker, though that hasn’t hurt a lot of white men in the past.

She’s been given basically the impossible task of “straighten out the issues at the border” with no hope of a resolution from Congress and no real resources from the Administration to do so. And hasn’t really been given any other high profile tasks where she can point to as “wins”.

Initially I liked her a lot and had her ranked near the top of my Democratic contenders from the field for 2020 but she wasn’t particularly good at laying out her vision or what she stood for, again something that hasn’t really held back a number of white men, but as time went on she dropped to like 4th or 5th on my list of top candidates.

I mean against anyone with (R) after their name, I’m almost certain I’d vote Harris but in a primary of an open Democratic field, I’m not sure she’d crack my top 5 these days.

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Have any vice presidents done anything “high profile”?

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